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Quick Breads

View Our Alphabetical Recipe Index for Quick Breads
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A large, commercial bakery that still exists, used to make these marvelous little corn cakes. They look like one of those Betty Crocker kid-sized layer cakes but are a cross between cornbread and a corn muffin. The company no longer makes these but everyone that knew them remembered these delightful corn cakes as being great either warmed up in a toaster plain, buttered, or with jam. A drizzle of melted butter and honey gives these the characteristic Pom Bakery moist surface and makes the corn flavor positively sing out. These freeze beautifully. To bake, you scoop them with an ice-cream scooper and them pat them down slightly. They obligingly bake up into flat, moist cakes no bigger than 4-5 good bites. Stuffed with fiber rich stoneground cornmeal or use regular cornmeal. If you could find a Mary Ann mold or a tiny layer cake pan, a la Betty Crocker kids' bakeset vintage - that would be the perfect mold for these (to make them Pom Bakery authentic). If baking in a mold, let the batter be a tiny bit softer (as the mold will support them). These are delicious as well as nostalgic.

Fruitcakes are fine but pecans are nutty and nostalgic. Fat pecans as well as toasted ground hazelnuts dominate this butter and brown-sugar laced batter. A soaking in pecan liqueur ensures it is sweet, moist and flavorful.If you cannot find pecan liqueur, use Frangelico which is a hazelnut liqueur. This is not really a bread, it is more a sweet, luscious nut cake. The fragrance of the baked cake is an incredible bouquet of nutty sweetness. The crumb of the cake is perfect.

A terrific combination.

I think anytime is the right time for a soda bread, especially one with the goodness of pumpkin and spice. This recipe is easy and quick and you wind up with a gorgeous-hued giant rustic bread, fragrant with spice and bursting with plump raisins. Fresh or toasted, this is a soda bread that hits one out of the park.
 

Yes, that old chestnut -that recipe that is everywhere and that they tell you you can bake a bit of it each day, ultimately holding the batter for 6 weeks. Ummm, no thank you. The notion of raw eggs handing around has no appeal not to mention, 6 weeks in a cold, wet environment tries the patience of even Clabber Girl's outstanding baking powder. But that stuff notwithstanding, you know –these are rather good.  Bake it the whole batch (double the recipe if you want), and freeze the muffins. These have been respun with a touch of honey and banana chunks. You could even use half peanut butter to replace the oil.

The pure buttery taste, with a trace of lemon zest, of this classic British loaf is wonderfully satisfying. You may wish to substitute chocolate chips for the currants if you prefer.

This banana loaf is deep in colour and has a beautiful crumb. Slow baking is the secret to this one-of-a-kind loaf. This makes two large loaves. This recipe is a good keeper but you might as well give one as a gift.

This is the most flavourful banana muffin I know. It also features huge, umbrella sprawled tops, and is flecked with toasted sweet walnuts throughout. I also sometimes, use part flax seeds and part walnuts. These freeze like a dream and look gourmet but homemade in taste. This makes 18 muffins so feel free to half the recipe.

  What I love about these rustic scones is they are they are very pure of taste – there's no chocolate chips, chunks of Snickers, no vanilla extra or hunks of candied ginger - there's just amazing taste and texture from the basic (but choice) ingredients. This is the real deal, old-fashioned baking, with a not-too-sweet, satisfying wholesome taste.

 The riper the bananas, the better the banana bread. The other tip is to hand-mash the bananas (no food processor) for the best textured banana bread. Marrying banana bread with the upbeat flavor duo of salty and sweet (peanuts and caramel) shows you how classic baking can become cutting edge with a few twists and tweaks.

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