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Vegetables

View Our Alphabetical Recipe Index for Vegetables
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Nothing beats a tender, crispy, slightly sweet, golden corn fritter. This is a summery morsel that is a meal on its own but it is intended as as side dish or appetizer. Fresh corn is best but even canned corn comes up shining in this delicious teaser. Serve with hot sauce or go sweet with a spritz of pure maple syrup or peach chutney.

April in Paris quiche is more like itYounger than springtime is this quiche, with its herbs and cheese mix. Perfect with lamb’s lettuce salad. You could substitute tender, sauteed leeks for the asparagus on another day.

This is the simplest, sunniest dish you can imagine. You layer on the ingredients – don’t bother stirring – slow roast and dip in. It is reminiscent in method of a Sabbath cholent but wonderfully flavorful and upbeat. It is best at room temperature or slightly chilled.

Ratners of New York, a beloved but now departed family restaurant that specialized in vegetarian kosher, served a vegetable cutlet with gravy. Their cookbook (which you can find on Ebay or second hand stores) included their own original version of this entrée and more recently Arthur Schwartz celebrated the recipe in his new cookbook, Jewish Home Cooking, Ten Speed Press. A vegetable cutlet is super for vegetarians and would make a nice main or side dish for Passover. I’ve made my own version of vegetable cutlets. It is a salute to Ratner’s and the wonderful creativity of kosher cooks who could take shoe leather, fry it with onions and make it taste good.

 

These mini kugels and are so tasty. You can also use the batter to make small vegetable latkes.

There are various ways of preparing this new classic (new meaning the last 40 years or so; it debuted in the 70’s). Essentially it is spaghetti or linguine tossed with fresh, springy vegetables such a peas, broccoli, asparagus in a light cream sauce that includes Parmesan, pine nuts and is all topped with basil. Chefs are tirelessly revamping it their way. This is my version – it is fresh, flavorful and not weighed down with the original mushrooms (which I love but to me are heartier versus springy fare). The only ‘difficult’ part of this dish is the vegetable preparation. And just make sure you choose a great imported Italian pasta as the foundation.Some chefs blanch the vegetables for this in a water broth that also contains a rind of Parmesan cheese for extra flavor. Another added touch with be a shaving of truffles, finely minced garlic croutons and some dots of chevre, or goat’s cheese.

Pomegranate juice seems to be vying with blueberries of late, for its health benefits. Sweet potatoes, slow braised in this juice, yielded deeply rich and flavorful potatoes. I also suggest half mango and half pomegranate juice for a variation on a great theme. ….and just in case you tire of the marshmallow and sweet potato bake (also in my recipe archives)

Top of the morning to you with these crisp diced potatoes, replete with peppers and onions. A confetti-like cheer of pototaes to go with some eggs, over easy.

Potatoes lightly browned in olive oil, with a smattering of wine, pancetta, parmesan cheese, and a taste that leaps out of the pan. This is a great crowd pleaser of a potato dish.
Serve with.....anything. Serve alone - they won't notice the absence of the main dish. These are especially good with any sort of grilled chicken, even store-bought rotisserie or Portugese chickens. If you can, use California or local (Quebec) garlic, versus Chinese garlic for a beautiful garlic bouquet.


 

There are a few recipes for this on the net and one in Secrets of a Jewish Baker by George Greenstein. The main elements are the same: potatoes, flour, yeast, eggs, and oil but the proportions differ substantially. I distilled this recipe down from all those I researched. To say this is outstanding, foodwise, is to say that the Mona Lisa is passing fair, as far as dabbling with oils go. This tastes like a potato latke, cuts like a quiche, and is a side dish wanting to go center stage. This is great hot, warm, or cold. Slather it with sour cream, or serve a thin wedge with a green salad and a BBQ chicken or grilled rib eye steak.

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