Current Issue
BB Past Issues
A Note From Marcy
Complete Recipe Index
Subscribe to BB
Subscriber Sign In
Free BB Classics
About Us
Contact Us
When Bakers Write - Features
Scent of A Baker
Books
Music and Dance
Product Reviews

Miscellaneous Baking

View Our Alphabetical Recipe Index for Miscellaneous Baking
Find a recipe via our alphabetical recipe index or you can also search using our Search bar for recipes by title or by type (in general Categories, muffins, breads, etc.)



Fried hotdogs? So good you’ll not want to share the technique. Score one of those super-sized kosher dogs. Deep fry (if you are baking French Fries – pop a couple of these in the oil). The dogs flare up and bulk in size – offering a crisp exterior and hot, juicy interior. Ballpark mustard, a fresh poppy seed roll and you’ve got game. A super 4th of July snack.

I like chamomile tea but it sometimes tastes like someone brewed wildflowers (which is essentially what chamomile is) and haystacks (which it isn’t). It can taste smooth and gentle or a bit gamey, depending on the brew. But if you add cinnamon and apples, you have a soother with style and autumn flair. It is almost…..celestial.

Black tea, touched up with minced Skor or Heath Bars. Mmmmmm.

This is an exceptionally easy, extremely tall, moist, gorgeous, oil-based chocolate cake. You cake hand mix or food processor make this fabulous cake. Pour and bake. It’s a hunk.Of course, you can also use melted unsalted butter for better flavor but oil-based cakes are good keepers.

This ultra tender, decadent cake combines some elements of a cheesecake, with a quick cake mix and then a dousing of Torani Creme Caramel Syrup. But I also tried it with Torani Cheesecake Syrup and Toffee Syrup and it was spectacular. Given www.Torani.com has a ton of syrup selections, there is no end to what you can do nor the creative adventure I am now embarked on. I know it is a cake mix (and I am working on the scratch version) but it is divine.
Check out http://www.torani.com/ 
the full listings of their famed syrups. They are also terrific (and as intended) added to teas, coffees, over ice-cream and in seltzer water (for that check out www.SodaStream.ca)

There are hundreds of variations on this theme. Try this one for starters.

Use flat egg noodles for this kugel. This is the serve-with-brisket or sweet and sour meatballs sort of kugel. It is never refused! In Yiddish, lukshin means, noodles or pasta. This is gently kissed with onion powder. Yes, I know - nothing beats real onions but I find this lighter onion approach ensures kids devour this dish. You can vary it by adding sauted mushrooms and onions for a more adult approach.

Homey and also traditional, this orange-scented dough made with oil is extra quick and easy - a bowl, wooden spoon and two hands are tools enough, and the one you'll probably most associate with your grandmother's famous recipe. Produces a slightly crisper hamantaschen than the one above, this recipe should tug at your tastebuds' memory.  If you want a softer hamantashen, increase the baking powder to 2 or 2 1/2 teaspoons, roll the dough thicker and instead of storing these in wax paper, store them in plastic wrap or a tin (which will soften them even more -i.e. more cakey, vs. pastry-like)

A cinch. No candy thermometer needed here.We make batches of this, wrap each square in twisted wax paper, and refrigerate. We pop back a morsel of this fudge (nicely chilled) anytime our spirits dip. Whatever is wrong, fudge will make it right.

This glorious tea is a replication of a special tea I had somewhere, once, with someone, on a sweet first date that featured this marvellous brew of toasted walnuts, almonds, caramel, chocolate and a hint of pure vanilla. You brew it, you sip it, you are ……transported. It is not quite tea, not quite cocoa but a sublime brew that is like a liquid dessert.  It takes but a touch of sugar and hint of milk. It is unique and satisfying like no Chai or Café Latte ever could hope to be. The tea should be a mix of long and small leaves. This makes a fine gift or conversation stopper (if served after a gourmet meal and some extraordinary BB desserts). For the tea leaves used, you want a mix of fine leaves and some longer ones.

Prev | 1 | .. | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | Next
Recommend This Page

 BakerBoulanger / BetterBaking.com 1997-2003