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Miscellaneous Baking

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A version of this appears almost everywhere and the one I originally saw was in The Way to Cook, by our beloved reine de cuisine, Julia Child. Julia originally called for zabaglione sauce and a last minute flaming of brandy or rum. I prefer a traditional hard sauce. You can make the pudding a week ahead and re-steam or microwave before serving. I offer it in small portions in miniature glass crème caramel molds or crystal stemware. The French gave us Buche Noel, but we can thank the Brits for steamed puddings. This can be made a week ahead and needs 1-2 hours steaming before serving or microwave before serving. A tin pudding mold can be found in kitchen shops or you can get an old-fashioned pudding mold at Golda's Kitchen in tin http://www.goldaskitchen.com/merchant.ihtml?pid=4662&step=4 (but Golda's has other choices as well). You can also use a 3-4 quart ceramic bowl. I had my first steamed pudding at a Chanukah party, years ago, hosted by my mom’s (still) best friend, Evelyn Ortenberg. It was the finale to a brisket and latkes meal! Since then, I have made it myself but it is also, in another guise, the famed steamed fruit pudding at Canada’s now-all-but-gone, Murray’s Restaurant chain. You can add dried cranberries or blueberries to this but frankly, I prefer it as old-fashioned as is and has been for centuries.

The classic sticky, gooey, delicious brown sugar pudding that's a sludgy cake.  A crusty top is broken into with an eager spoon...to get at all the goo inside or top it with the delicious sticky toffee sauce.

A dense, dark spicy bread.

Another recipe inspired by Commander’s Palace of New Orleans. Puffy, fried hominy (cream of wheat or use cornmeal) croquettes topped with a spicy sausage and scrambled egg crown. We recommend Trappey’s Red Devil hot sauce with all our New Orlean’s recipes.

Take a cornbread base, add El Paso style taco filling, top with Monterey Jack and serve with a side of salsa, avocado slices, and sour cream and diced chilies. Whoa Nellie. This is best served in small hunks of chili and cornbread base - on a gorgeous Santa Fe style ceramic plate or Fiesta ware, alongside a mixed green salad and ice-cold iced tea and lime wedges.

(Part of a series on "commercial foods")
A cracker of a snack.

A vibrant sandwich featuring a rustic black rye roll as the foundation to buttery Boston lettuce, cranberry salsa, feta cheese and sliveres of sweet pickle. This vegetarian sandwich touches all the right notes - it makes your mouth tingle.

An exquisite blend, inspired by Dorset Cereals of the UK famed granola. This makes a noble cereal that tastes beautiful and looks gorgeous, packed up in cello bags and tied with a scarlet ribbon. Or use a huge Mason jar. Pack this in a basket with two Pier 1 bowls and the New York Times.

Great for tea time and informal hosting. A gorgeous river of a cream cheese swirld makes this cake exceptional in taste and looks. It also slices like a dream and it features the seasonal perk of fresh cranberries. A wonderful gift cake. The Lemon Glaze below the recipe is totally optional.

These are super with sharp cheddar or blue cheese. They can be delicate and slightly blistered or thin and extra crisp. Make them with all white flour or with a tiny bit of whole wheat (or white wholewheat if you can find it)
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